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The Registry is an international group of people who have been a healthy weight their entire life. By joining the Registry and answering a few questions, they help us learn how people can stay a healthy weight and secrets that other people around the world use to stay slim and healthy.

Researchers at the Cornell Food and Brand Lab analyze their (anonymous) answers to these questions, and uncover insights into how people can better avoid gaining weight. These insights are published in academic papers and shared to members and Registry friends through social media, infographics, tip sheets, and publications.

In short, the Registry is where healthy weight people share their secrets with you.

The Global Heathy Weight Registry aims to discover the secrets of people who have maintained healthy body weights their entire lives. We are interested in people who are 18 years or older and have maintained a healthy body weight throughout their adult life – never fluctuating more than 5-10 pounds (except during pregnancy), and who have not worked with weight counselors or other health professionals regarding their weight in the past. There are also a couple other screening questions that you will be asked.

If you think you’re eligible, click here. You’ll be asked some initial screening questions. Following this, you’ll be asked a long, 45-minute series of questions on topics such as your childhood, food preferences, dining habits, and hobbies, and so on.

By being part of the Registry you’ll be sent updates with new insights we are learning from other members and new research papers we are publishing. Each year there will be an updated series of questions you’ll be asked to answer.

If you do not wish to be part of the Registry any longer simply let us know or do not fill out the survey. If you wish to join again at a later date, you’re free to do that if still eligible. All names are always kept confidential. 

If you are not eligible to be part of the Registry, we can still keep you up-to-date on some of our findings through our email list.
In addition, we value your participation on our social media channels which can be accessed by clicking the icons on the bottom of the page.

They are our inspiration.

The National Weight Control Registry was founded at Brown University in the mid-1990s by Dr. Rena Wing and Dr. James Hill. Their goal was to look for unique insights in how overweight people have successfully lost weight (30-lbs or more) and have kept it off for at least 1 year. Many of the useful insights we have from weight loss come from the survey responses from their 10,000 members.

The National Weight Control Registry investigates people who have lost weight and kept it off. We complement their focus on treatment by focusing on prevention. That is, what can we learn from people who never gained the weight to begin with.

The Registry was first launched in August 2014 as the Slim By Design Registry because it was detailed in the book of the same name on page 21. Since that time we’ve found that not all people who were interested in the website wanted to be slim. Some simply wanted to be healthier at their current weight.

In late 2015 the site was relaunched as the Global Healthy Weight Registry as a direct result of what we learned from previous Registry surveys.

We’re going to crunch through it to discover some of the tips and tendencies of healthy weight people so we can help them – and others – avoid gaining weight (or helping them lose weight). We’ll write academic articles and develop infographics, posts, and tweets and share them to help other people. All of your answers are confidential. They are not associated with your name or email. There are a lot of great insights we’ve already learned and shared. Every person who joins gives us more and more ideas and helps more and more people.

For 25 years, the researchers at the Food and Brand Lab (now at Cornell University) have been discovering solutions to help people eat less and eat better. Led by Professor Brian Wansink, their discoveries have changed the way millions of people eat. The Registry and all of its questions and activities have been approved by the Cornell Institutional Review Board.

This Registry will uncover key insights to help make and keep people healthier. Although we don’t have grant support or sponsorship, we think this is too important to not do right now. For this reason, Professor Wansink is sponsoring the development of the site and the collection of data to give it important continuity.

Here’s a useful article describing the Registry (from the Cornell Chronicle, August 13, 2014)

Slim People Asked to Share Tips in Registry

While many struggle with their weight and count calories, everyone has slim friends who never seem to gain weight. What kind of simple rules of thumb, principles or benchmarks do they use that lead them to take less, order less and eat less?

“Their secrets are usually very simple,” says Cornell Professor Brian Wansink, director of the Cornell Food and Brand Lab. “For instance, when we ask them what they do at summer picnics, they say things like eat only home-made foods, or taste everything and then go back for seconds on the favorites, or eat only one dessert.”

To systematically determine what slim people do, Wansink and colleagues at the Cornell Food and Brand Lab have launched the Slim by Design Registry [NOTE: Now called the Global Healthy Weight Registry. Announced at the annual meeting of the TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) Club, a nonprofit weight-loss support and wellness education organization, in Milwaukee last month, the registry is intended to collect these tips in a way that can help slim people stay slim and the rest of us to slim down.

The registry is modeled on the National Weight Loss Registry, which asked people to register and share their experiences if they had lost 30 pounds and kept it off for three years. It gave hundreds of thousands of people insights into how to take weight off and keep it off, Wansink says.

However, the Slim by Design Registry is only open to people who have never gained weight. “We’re interested in members who have been a healthy weight all of their life,” says Wansink. “By knowing what they do, we can become more slim by design rather than slim by willpower.”

Upon completing a short prescreening survey at SlimByDesign.org, potential registry members are invited to complete an intake survey. The questions range from what they eat for their typical breakfast to what they do to avoid nighttime snacking; it asks about cooking secrets, philosophies on food and eating, and even about basic outlooks on life. Upon finishing the intake survey, people are sent a welcome kit and regular newsletters of tips from survey results. Abbreviated findings will be available on the Web. Twice a year, registrants will be invited to answer follow-up questions.

At the website, readers can review some lists on what slim people say they do. For example, it shows that what slim people do to feel full are eat soups and stews, hard-boiled eggs, Greek yogurt, salmon or tuna and add eggs to dishes.

Source: Cornell Chronicle – August 13, 2014